Q2) Consistency – Examples

THE APPLE LOGO

Figure 3: Source: Apple logo [Digital Image], 2013.

Figure 3: Source: Apple logo [Digital Image], 2013.

The sensational success of Apple products is mostly due to its innovative, modern applications and its monochromic logo of an apple. Apple is internationally renowned by using the same logo with its services including the iPhone, iMac, iPod, iPad or the lastest model, MacBook Air. This clearly portrays the company as an aesthetically consistent identity that customers can relate to and trust. In addition, by using the same color and the hierarchy placement of the logo on its products, Apple ‘serves as a mark of membership’ into a engaging environment for both the user and product (Zoll, 2007, p. 2). The company’s simplistic and consistent design corresponds with the lifestyle of the 21st century: A need for fast, simple and attractive services that communicate a sense of belonging and foster positive emotions.

 

PLAY, REWIND, REPLAY, PAUSE

We have all come across these buttons in our everyday lives whether that is on our smartphones or at home playing our favorite movies with a remote control. By adhering to our prior knowledge we can grasp new concepts and devices with ease and assurance. Moreover, the functional consistency of these symbols enhances the ‘usability and learnability’ of other systems that function or work in a similar way (Lidwell, Holden & Butler, 2010, p. 46). Consumers are more likely to adapt to consistent concepts of design as it provides a comforting experience, which assimilates a solid meaning about the device to the user.

 

Figure 2: Source: BSPlayer [Snapshot], 2014.

Figure 2: Source: BSPlayer [Snapshot], 2014.

ROAD SIGNS

Every design or system should ‘always be internally consistent’ with the primary factors of an appealing aesthetic and a manageable functionality (Lidwell, Holden & Butler, 2010, p. 46). For example, street indicators including school zones or no entry signs all use consistent design elements to create a familiar environment in the system. Furthermore, road signs have a cohesive and similar design that mean the same thing internationally, yet may differ in colour or typeface from country to country.

 

Figure 1: Source: Bicycle Dutch [Digital Image], 2012.

Figure 1: Source: Bicycle Dutch [Digital Image], 2012.

References:

Lidwell, W., Holden, K., & Butler, J. (2003). Universal principles of design. Massachusetts, MA: Rockport.

Zoll, L.J. (2007). A Tradeshow Design for Nintendo of America. Retrieved from http://books.google.com.au/

Apple logo. (2013) In Google Images [Digital Image]. Retrieved May 21, 2014, from http://raisoturu.com/apple-logo-hd-wallpapers-download-apple-free-logo-hd-wallpapers/

BSPlayer. (2014) In Google Images [Snapshot]. Retrieved May 21, 2014, from https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.bsplayer.bspandroid.free&hl=en

Bicycle Dutch. (2012) In Google Images [Digital Image]. Retrieved May 21, 2014, from http://bicycledutch.wordpress.com/2012/06/04/road-signs-for-cycling-in-the-netherlands/

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